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IV Therapy at Home

During your hospital stay, Antibiotics may be started intravenously and once therapeutic levels have been attained and measure to fight the infection it is common for patients to be discharged home with IV therapy prescriptions. Enayati Home Nursing team will come to the hospital and gather the prescriptions and doctor orders and schedule the therapies to maintain the therapeutic level. Sometimes the doctor at the hospital will order for blood lab investigations once a week to test the efficacy of the treatment. Enayati Home Nursing team can draw the blood tests and arrange with you on the delivery to the hospital as part of the service.
 
IV Therapy may require long term catheters to be inserted by the physician while in the hospital, called a PICC (Peripheral Inserted Central Catheter) line, and or a Porta Catheter, for patients on extended therapies. These catheters do not require to be changed every 3 days and because of its large size is placed in the veins closer to the heart allowing for high concentrations of medications.
 
IV Therapy may be ordered by the Hospital physician once, twice or thrice daily, depending on the organisms and other health status. It is important to maintain the schedule of the therapies up to 45 minutes. While most IV medications can be infused over 30-45 minutes, some may require slower time to prevent reactions, for example Vancomycin and “red man syndrome”.
 
Normal peripheral access required to be changed every 3 days. They are sometimes difficult to acquire in the community especially for patients with poor circulation, frequent IV access. Enayati Home Nursing team complete the most difficult IV cannulation using technologies.
 
Initiating new types of Antibiotics at home is not recommended in order to monitor for any adverse reactions to the drug. Initiation of new antibiotics is best done in-facility. Continuation of the same therapy in the home is then possible.
 
Enayati Home Nursing patient safety goal is to minimize infection and follow strict standards and guidelines in the management of central and peripheral IV catheters. Every introduction of a catheter into a patient introduces risk. Following best practices and standards will minimize those risks. Ask your home nursing team if their facility is Internationally Accredited, which will give you a feeling of confidence that their staff and training protocols have been audited to meet the stringent standards. Patient Safety begins with following Standards.

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